Flash games will not disappear when the Adobe Flash support is gone

Flash games will not disappear when the Flash support is gone

Flash games will not disappear when the Adobe Flash support is gone. There are many portals with thousands of games made in Flash that have existed for decades, and the disappearance of this technology will force their administrators to change their business model. Because if they cannot adapt the flash games to the modern HTML5, it will not be feasible for many of them.

During the last few years, alternatives have been emerging to save them, such as the Flashpoint, but now another one is born, the Internet Archive.

Flash games will not disappear when the Flash support is gone

Internet Archive is a large non-profit digital library that stores information of all kinds. It is well known for being responsible for the Wayback Machine, a portal that stores websites even if they have disappeared from the Internet.

Now they announce that they will keep the animations and Flash games before they disappear at the end of 2020. The portal will emulate the content to make it work as it used to, preserving critical elements of the “primitive Internet culture” for browsers that can no longer run them.

At the moment there are only a few hundred games and animations available, with classics such as “Peanut Butter Jelly Time”.

How will you manage to run Flash?

They get it to work with a developing Flash emulator called Ruffle, which is incorporated into their system.

The problem with Ruffle is that currently, it is not compatible with most of the Flash projects made after 2013, although it still leaves room for a huge amount of material created since the beginning of the century.

Flash games will not disappear when the Flash support is gone
Flash games will not disappear when the Flash support is gone

The expiration date for Flash was announced in 2017 when Adobe said they are ending support, but before that Apple had already commented that it would not allow Flash on iOS in 2010. Years later Chrome, Edge and Safari opted to use HTML5 by default, leaving Flash aside, which is already blocked by default.

Internet Archive has moved aggressively in running a range of older software in the browser over the last decade.

Flash games will not disappear when the Flash support is gone. When Adobe Flash is gone, many operating systems will automatically remove the player from the browser and the system. They want to prevent part of the Internet’s history from disappearing without a trace.