Intel changes CEO: Pat Gelsinger returns

Intel changes CEO: Pat Gelsinger returns

Intel changes CEO and Pat Gelsinger, the veteran engineer and former CEO of VMware, returns to the company for taking the seat.

Two years later, Bob Swan leaves the position of Intel’s CEO. After Brian Krzanich’s resignation, Swan took the reins at Intel to face the biggest challenge in the company’s history. But next February 15th he will leave the position, as the company has announced in a statement. Pat Gelsinger, former CTO of Intel and ex-CEO of VMWare, will be the new CEO of Intel.

During these last two years, Intel has suffered before its competitors. AMD’s chipsets have made a major leap, while Intel’s 11th generation processors have suffered delays. Added to this is the acquisition of ARM by NVIDIA and the arrival of Apple’s ARM processors, ending their alliance with Intel for MacBook.

A new era might start with Pat Gelsinger, who has an engineering background

At the end of last year, the director and founder of the investment fund Third Point Management, Daniel Loeb, sent a letter to Intel proposing different actions to face and solve the different problems it was facing. From Intel they explained that they hoped to collaborate with Third Point to “increase value for their shareholders”. Less than a month later, Intel returned to a technical profile to lead the company.

Intel changes CEO Pat Gelsinger returns
Intel changes CEO Pat Gelsinger returns

According to Intel, the company “has made great progress in its 7 nanometer technology and expects to provide an update at the end of January”. Pat Gelsinger worked for 30 years at Intel and according to Omar Ishrak, one of Intel’s management members, it was concluded that “now is the right time to make this leadership change to leverage Pat’s technology and engineering expertise during this critical period of transformation at Intel.

During his time at Intel, Gelsinger became the company’s first CTO and helped develop technologies such as USB and WiFi. He was the architect of the 80486 processor, played an important role in the development of the Core and Xeon families and was responsible for more than 14 processor lines at Intel.

From Bob Noyce to Brian Krzanich, all of Intel’s CEOs have had a long tradition within the company. Pat Gelsinger faces the challenge of leading Intel’s transition to an industry where the performance and efficiency of competing chipsets is increasing.